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Finding Aids
A finding aid is a descriptive guide to the content of a collection. The guide describes the origin, background, contents, and arrangement of a collection. It also includes a folder listing of the contents.

Processed Collections
The alphbetical links below lead to an annotated list of all processed collections with links to the finding aids.

Finding Aids by Collection Type

  Manuscript Collections
  Photograph Collections
  Small Manuscript Collections
  Biography Files
  Oral History Collection
  Microfilm Collection


 

 



Frequently Asked Questions

1. Who are we?
2. Where is AHF located and what are its hours?
3. Who is eligible to research at AHF?
4. What are the AHF reading room rules?
5. How do I find out what materials AHF has in its collections?
6. Does AHF provide access to unprocessed collections?
7. What are primary sources?
8. What other sources should I check before visiting AHF?
9. May I use a laptop computer in the reading room?
10. May I bring my scanner or camera to make copies of a document or photograph?
11. May I ask reference questions by telephone and email?
12. Will AHF staff do research for me?
13. May I browse the shelves of books and collections?
14. What is AHF’s reproduction policy?
15. May I use an image for my school project, classroom, or personal use?
16. May I use an image for a commercial use?
17. Am I required to cite AHF materials?
18. Does AHF loan materials?
19. What if I want to donate materials to AHF?
20. How does AHF decide what material to accept?
21. How do I determine the value of my collection or books?


1. Who are we?
The Arizona Historical Foundation is a 501(c) 3 organization founded in 1959 by Senator Barry M. Goldwater. We are an academic repository of historical documents and primary source materials that focus on the economics and politics of the New West. We are the only private, non-profit repository in Arizona offering reference services 47 hours a week.

We are often confused with the Arizona Historical Society and the Goldwater Institute. While AHF and the Arizona Historical Society are part of the larger collecting community in Arizona, we are separate organizations with different missions and services. The Goldwater Institute is not an archival repository. It is an independent research and educational organization that studies public policy.


2. Where is AHF located and what are its hours?
We are located on the 4th floor of the Charles T. Hayden Library at Arizona State University, Tempe Campus. Map and parking information is available. AHF hours are 8:00am – 5:00pm Monday through Friday.


3. Who is eligible to research at AHF?

AHF is open to the public. No appointment is necessary to use the collections. Researchers who require large amounts of material or in-depth reference are encouraged to contact AHF in advance. Some collections are stored off-site and require advance notice before they can be transferred to the reading room.


4. What are the AHF reading room rules?

The reading room rules are contained in the AHF “Conditions of Use” form. Each researcher is required to indicate an understanding of the conditions by signing the form for each visit or online request. The policies are designed to protect our collections while providing the best possible access to researchers.


5. How do I find out what materials AHF has in its collections?

Please see the Home page for information on topics, formats, finding aids, and search information.


6. Does AHF provide access to unprocessed collections?
Yes. Please see the list of Unprocessed Collections for titles and topics.


7. What are primary sources?

A primary source is material that contains firsthand accounts of events which was created at the time of the event or later recalled by an eyewitness. Examples include letters, diaries, government, church and business records, oral histories, drawings, photographs, videos, maps, land records, newspaper articles, and certain electronic records such as email..


8. What other sources should I check before visiting AHF?

Check secondary sources on your topic before visiting. A secondary source is a work not based on direct observation or evidence. Examples include books, websites, online databases, and magazines or journals. It is best to have background information and basic facts before you begin researching primary sources. Know the date ranges, geographical locations, key individuals or organizations related to your topic because primary sources may be filed under any or all of these headings. This will save you time and money.


9. May I use a laptop computer in the reading room?

Laptops may be used in the reading room. Hayden Library provides wireless access to the Internet for students, faculty, staff and guests. Users must register with ASU Libraries, not AHF, to gain access to the wireless network.


10. May I bring my scanner or camera to make copies of a document or photograph?

No. In order to maintain control on the proliferation and the quality of images housed here, we do not allow patrons to bring their own photographic equipment or scanners into the reading room. We can provide photocopies of documents and scans of the images for you.


11. May I ask reference questions by telephone and email?

We welcome inquiries by mail, email and telephone as noted in Contact Information. In fact, it can save you time in the reading room.


12. Will AHF staff do research for me?

We can help you but we can’t do it for you. Staff searches are limited to 30 minutes per request. Requests that require more time may require a personal visit to the reading room or hiring a research assistant. We can provide a list of professional researchers in the Phoenix area who work for an hourly fee.


13. May I browse the shelves of books and collections?

No. AHF stacks are not open to the public. No materials may be checked or loaned out. Researchers must request all materials at the reference desk for viewing in the reading room.


14. What is AHF’s reproduction policy?

We provide a range of reproduction options from photocopies to digital images. Reproductions may also be made for researchers wishing to publish, broadcast, perform, or exhibit the materials if those researchers have received prior permission to publish from AHF. Please see the Permission to Publish form for scope and conditions of publication. Purchase of a reproduction does not in itself carry the right to publish or quote from that work. Researchers must complete the Permission to Publish form. Please consult the schedule of Use Fees or contact AHF with any questions about the permissions process.


15. May I use an image for my school project, classroom, or personal use?

Yes. You are welcome to use images for educational and personal use.


16. May I use an image for a commercial use?

Researchers wishing to publish, quote, broadcast, perform or exhibit materials (including use on websites) must receive permission from the copyright holder (if any) and AHF. Please note that we do not hold copyright for all of the materials in our collections. We simply grant the researcher permission to use materials in our collections. In some cases, we may require written proof of the copyright holder’s permission before granting permission.


17. Am I required to cite AHF materials?

You should note the materials you use and where they came from, especially if you want copies or need to locate the materials later. While citation criteria may vary for academic papers and publication, we suggest the following when using our collections:
Arizona Historical Foundation, name of the collection, box and folder number or other unique identifier, e.g., Arizona Historical Foundation, Ruth Reinhold Collection, Box 28, Folder 1.

For website use, the statement should read “From the Collections of the Arizona Historical Foundation, Copy and Reuse Restrictions Apply” and be placed near the image.


18. Does AHF loan materials?

No. We do not loan material to individuals, businesses or other repositories.


19. What if I want to donate materials to AHF?
We welcome inquiries from individuals, families, organizations, and businesses that may have documents relating to the economics and politics of the New West. Please contact our Chief Archivist, Linda Whitaker for more information. If the material doesn’t fit our collecting focus, we will refer the donor to a more appropriate repository.


20. How does AHF decide what material to accept?

Storage space, budget, and staffing are often determining factors and so we ask ourselves: Does the material fall within the collecting focus of AHF? Will it meet researcher expectations? Does it fill in gaps in the historical record? Is the information largely unique or does it duplicate materials held elsewhere? Is the collection coherent and mostly complete or merely fragments of the original? Does it require extensive preservation beyond our budget? Can we meet donor expectations?


21. How do I determine the value of my collection or books?

IRS regulations prohibit library and archive staff from appraising the value of materials donated. Qualified appraisers can be located by checking the yellow pages under “appraisers” and “book dealers-used and rare.” The Appraisers Association of America, at www.appraisers.org, has an online appraiser locater service. We also have a list of local appraisers.